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Allen & Heath dLive S5000 Used, Second hand

Ref. code: 1.06.262

dLive S5000

The S5000 is a medium-sized control Surface for the dLive MixRack, with the addition of built-in audio I/O and audio networking ports. It features 28 faders over 6 layers, dual 12? capacitive touchscreens and the innovative Harmony UI for the fastest workflow in the industry.

Harmony User Interface

Where many digital consoles try to recreate the experience of using an analogue mixer, dLive is a true digital native, drawing on our familiarity with the ubiquitous smartphones and tablets that we all use without thinking. The single or twin 12? capacitive touchscreens on the dLive consoles feel instantly familiar, responding to every pinch, swipe, drag and drop exactly how you?d expect them to. Bespoke ?widget? areas can also be set up on the screens to keep track of scenes, meters, FX and other custom controls. The screen is framed by a set of one knob / one function rotary controls, allowing the creativity and immediacy of tactile control over key processing functions, working in harmony with the visual feedback displayed on the screen. The rotary knobs have been prototyped 20+ times to achieve optimal grip and precision control, and feature RGB illumination, with colours mapped to functions for instant visual orientation.

Transparent Workflow

As systems become ever more complex and as I/O counts grow exponentially, engineers can find themselves feeling increasingly removed from the action on stage as they are drawn more and more into managing the arsenal of technologies at their disposal. Throughout the dLive design process our guiding aim has been to create fast and transparent workflows that allow the engineer to focus on the mix, not the mixer. The dLive layout is fully customisable, allowing the user to create a mixing interface that matches their own mental map of the show. Every input or mix can be assigned to any and every bank and / or layer, virtual scribble strips allow inputs and mixes to be clearly named and colour coded for at-a-glance navigation, and the engineer has no less than 26 assignable SoftKeys at their disposal, plus 3 pages of 6 assignable rotaries per screen.

Built To Endure

Maybe it?s no coincidence that our lead mechanical designer on the dLive project used to be a tank commander. All dLive consoles have been designed to deliver the optimal balance between strength and weight, employing higher grade metal on the sides and folded steel at key points for added rigidity. Not only does every console, MixRack and expander have dual power supply slots for redundancy, but we?ve also employed the same rugged, hot-swappable PSU design across the range for maximum peace of mind and minimum inventory. Dual redundancy is also built into every audio connection throughout the system. We have also paid particular attention to console illumination, conducting rigorous trials to ensure that dLive excels in the sunny, outdoor settings where many digital consoles become almost unusable.

Features
  • 28 faders
  • Fully assignable layout ? 168 fader strips
  • Harmony UI integrates screen and wrap-around controls
    • Dual 12? capacitive touchscreen
    • Gesture control ? pinch, swipe, drag ?n drop
    • Dedicated multi-mode EQ view
    • Configurable widget areas for Scenes, meters, FX and more
    • 3 pages of 6 assignable rotaries per screen
  • 26 assignable SoftKeys
  • Engineer?s Wedge and IEM fader strips
  • Comprehensive multipoint metering
  • Daylight visibility
  • USB stereo recording and playback
  • 8 XLR mic/line in, 8 XLR line out
  • 2 digital st AES3 in, 3 digital st AES3 out
  • Connection hub
    • Dual redundant GigaACE gigabit link to MixRack
    • 1x redundant DX link for I/O expansion
    • 2x I/O Ports ? 128 ch 96 kHz each
    • 2x Network ports
    • Wordclock BNC I/O
    • Video output
  • Dual redundant, hot swappable power supply
  • 3 Year Warranty

Used Allen & Heath


Allen & Heath (also known as AH or A&H) is a company based in Penryn, Cornwall, England, specialising in the manufacture of audio mixing consoles. Allen & Heath also makes sound management systems for industrial installations and DJ mixers for nightclubs.
Allen & Heath is now part of Audiotonix. Allen & Heath was the first manufacture to mount pots and switches on the input channel circuit board. These were the first modular mixers where sub-systems could be replaced as a unit. Allen & Heath was the first company to make a small mixer, a 6 channel, 2 output transistorised mixer called the MiniMixer. The Allen & Heath Syncron A mixer was the first to use op-amps. The Allen & Heath CMC console was the first console to use a microprocessor to integrate MIDI capabilities with a mixer. The GL2 console combined Front of House (FOH) and stage monitor functionality into a single mixer, what is called a "dual function" mixer.

Efficiency Rating: Level of sound output measured at a prescribed distance with a standard input power. Efficiency rating standard is 1 watt (2.83V at 8 ohms) at 1 meter over a specified frequency range and is measured in decibels.

Equalization: Loosely, any type of relative frequency adjustment. Specifically, the process of changing the frequency balance of an electrical signal to alter the acoustical output.

Equalizer: A component designed to alter the frequency balance of an audio signal. Equalizers may be graphic, parametric, or a combination of both.

Fade: A gradual increase in audio, i.e. a fade-up, or a gradual decrease in audio, i.e. a fade-down.

Feedback: The transmission of current or voltage from the output of a device back to the input, where it interacts with the input signal to modify operation of the device. Feedback is positive when it’s in phase with the input and negative when it's out of phase.

FM: Frequency Modulated.

Frequency: The number of cycles (vibrations) per second. In audio, audible frequencies commonly range from 20 to 20,000 cycles per second (Hz). In video, frequency is used to define the image resolution. Low-frequency video images depict large objects or images. Higher frequencies depict smaller objects (finer details.

Frequency Response: A measure of what frequencies can be reproduced and how accurately they are reproduced. A measurement of 20 to 20,000 Hz, 3dB means those frequencies between 20 and 20,000 Hz can be reproduced no more than 3 dB above or below a reference frequency level.

Full-Range: A speaker designed to reproduce the full range (20 Hz to 20 kHz) of audio frequencies.

Gain: Increase in level or amplitude.

Gooseneck: This refers to a microphone with a flexible neck that is most frequently attached to a podium or lectern. It is designed to allow the speaker to raise or lower the microphone to a suitable height.

Graphic Equalizer: A type of equalizer with sliding controls that creates a pattern representing a graph of the frequency-response changes. Raising sliders boosts the affected frequencies lowering sliders cuts (attenuates) the affected frequencies.

HDCP: High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection. Created by Intel, HDCP is used with HDTV signals over DVI and HDMI connections and on D-Theater D-VHS recordings to prevent unauthorized duplication of copyright material.

HDR: Hard-Drive Recorder. Device that uses a computer hard drive to store compressed digital audio and video signals.

High Pass: A filter that passes high frequencies, and attenuates low frequencies. Same as low cut.

Hz: Hertz or cycles per second. Something that repeats a cycle once each second moves at a rate of 1 Hz.

Incue/Inq/In-Point: These words all refer to the initial few seconds of audio signifying the beginning of the production.

Integrated Amplifier: A combination preamp and amplifier.

Impedance: A measure of the impediment to the flow of alternating current, measured in ohms at a given frequency. Larger numbers mean higher resistance to current flow.

KHz: Kilohertz or one thousand Hz.

Lavaliere: A small microphone that attaches to clothing, allowing the speaker to have a hands-free presentation.

Line Array: A group of speakers that have been arrayed or ” built up” in the vertical or horizontal plane, which allow for a highly consistent sound field. A Line Array is perfect for medium to large audiences.

Line-Level (Low-Level): A level of electrical signals too low to make the average speaker move sufficiently. Amplifiers receive line-level signals and amplify them to speaker level.

lockout: The final words of a segment used to signify the production’s conclusion.

Low Pass: A filter that lets low frequencies go through but doesn’t let high frequencies go through. Same as high cut.

MHz: Megahertz, or 1 million Hz.

Midbass: The middle of the bass part of the frequency range, from approximately 50 to 100 Hz (upper bass would be from 100 to 200 Hz). Also used as a term for loudspeaker drivers designed to reproduce both bass and midrange frequencies.

Midrange: The middle of the audio frequency range. Also used as a term for loudspeaker drivers designed to reproduce this range.

Mixer: This is the unit in which audio signals are directed from. A mixer provides for both mic and line input combinations while allowing you to control one or more outputs.

MLP: Meridian Lossless Packing. Encoding format that is able to completely reconstruct the original signal at the receiving end. No information is lost or discarded, regardless of how trivial it might be. Used to encode six channels of high-resolution audio on DVD-A.

Mono: Monophonic sound. One channel.

MP3: MPEG-1 Audio Layer-3. Compression scheme used to transfer audio files via the Internet and store in portable players and digital audio servers.

Natural Sound (NATS): The nonverbal audio that occurs in a non-studio setting. NATS can be used to help characterize the setting.

Noise: An unwanted portion of a signal such as hiss, hum, whine, static, or buzzing.

Nonlinear Editing: Digital audio systems that allow for clips to be extracted without affecting the master recording.

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Allen & Heath dLive S5000 Used, Second hand
Price:
12.700,00€
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